H.M.S. Hood Today
Photos of the Wreck of H.M.S. Hood in 2001

Updated 07-Nov-2016

Contained herein, are many photos of the wreck of H.M.S. Hood as it appeared at the bottom of the Denmark Strait in 2001. We owe a special debt of gratitude to our friend David L. Mearns of Blue Water Recoveries Ltd, for generously allowing us to post these photos here. Additionally, we would also like to thank renowned author and draughtsman John Roberts for his invaluable assistance in helping us to identify items pictured here. Lastly, much thanks to accomplished graphics artist Thomas Schmid, for the computer renderings shown here.

Important Notice: These photographs have been exclusively loaned for display here on the official H.M.S. Hood Association web site, and are not to be downloaded or republished elsewhere without the express permission of David L. Mearns and Blue Water Recoveries Ltd. The wreck renderings may not be downloaded or republished elsewhere without the express permission of Thomas Schmid.

Chainbar divider

The Bow
The bow is approximately 100 ft/ 30.5 m in length. It is lying on its port side and appears to be just a shell- much of its internal structure has collapsed or is otherwise gone. Because of this, it is greatly deformed/crushed below and aft of its remaining structure, the hawse pipes and prow. Its anchor cables stream out in different directions (neither anchor was found).

Please note that we have slightly modified some of these photos; some were lightened/brightened a small amount to reduce the "murkiness" inherent in underwater photographs. Lastly, please be aware that this page is image intensive, and may take some time to fully load.


Hoods bow then and now
Above- Views of Hood's bow, "then" and "now": On the top, a mosaic of images shot in July 2001. On the bottom, a computer graphic showing the approximate size of the bow section. This latter images is by no means an 100% accurate depiction, but is sufficiently close enough to enable the reader to comprehend the current state of the bow.

Bow of H.M.S. Hood
The tip of the bow, or, "prow". The "bull ring" (a hoop-like fitting that one sat at the very edge) is now gone as are the stanchions and wooden flagstaff. Note the various deck fittings and even the presence of some teak decking. Also note the degaussing cable/coil that encircles the section. This cable was a means of demagnetising the hull so as to not attract magnetic mines. The degaussing cable can also be seen in the 1940 bow photo at the top of the page.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Shown here is Hood's large starboard bow fairlead. Also seen is a section of anchor cable/chains. To the left, you can see how the lower structure of the bow has been severely crushed by implosion.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Moving aft, one can now see the rear half of the large starboard bow fairlead. It is entirely intact (as is its port counterpart). The large main anchor cable/anchor is still visible as is a smaller chain. This is the same size chain as that shown in the 1940 bow photo at the top of this page. It was against this chain that the Roll of Honour plaque was ultimately laid.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Moving farther aft, the planking is more readily visible. One can also see the forward edge of the starboard degaussing cable fairing. This was essentially a metal plate fixed to the hull's top edge, that made it possible for the degaussing cable to rise over and around the anchor. A similar, but smaller fairing also existed to port (as can be seen in the 1940 bow photo at the top of this page).


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
More of the degaussing cable fairing. It appears to be notably damaged, with the twin cables being exposed. One can also see the forward starboard hawse pipe. This was an opening in the ship's side which extended up through the forecastle deck. It was where the starboard forward anchor was stored.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Moving aft from the forward hawse pipe towards the rear hawse pipe. At this point, the gutted interior of the bow comes into site. The forward most bollard can be seen attached to a piece of decking that has collapsed downward into the bow. More of the damaged degaussing cable and fairing can be seen as well.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
This is the aft starboard hawse pipe. Hood once had two anchors to starboard, but sometime late in her career the aftermost one was removed. The through-deck opening of the hawse pipe was covered with a grating topside. That grating is still in place. From here aft, the bow takes on a rather cavernous appearance- its decks have either been ripped out or have collapsed downward and out of sight.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Aft of the rear hawsepipe, the hull is largely gutted.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
This is the the broken end of the bow section. This corresponds to roughly where the capstans were once located. Its notably tangled and twisted.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Another view of the bow. To the right, the bow is crushed.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Here is another view of the forward portion of the degaussing cable fairing. The starboard forward hawse pipe openings is also clearly in view. If you look closely at the fairing, you can see that there is a rectangular opening within the fairing. This is for a small fairlead. From here aft, the fairing is heavily damaged. The depressed/deformed area of the lower bow is especially noticeable in this view. This crushed appearance may have been caused by implosion, by the decks having been ripped out, or by a combination of both.


Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Here is another view of the forward portion of the degaussing cable fairing. Both starboard hull hawse pipe openings are also visible.



Bow of H.M.S. Hood
Close-up of the bow. Traces of Home Fleet Dark Grey paint can still be seen in places.